Investigating privacy-related phenomena, prior research has often pointed to discrepancies between users’ privacy concerns and disclosing behaviors, denoted as the privacy paradox. That is, users tend to disclose their data as if they didn’t care, even if they declare to be highly worried about their privacy.

Investigating privacy-related phenomena, prior research has often pointed to discrepancies between users’ privacy concerns and disclosing behaviors, denoted as the privacy paradox. That is, users tend to disclose their data as if they didn’t care, even if they declare to be highly worried about their privacy. Empirical evidence on this dichotomy arises from numerous studies reporting small and non-significant correlations between stated privacy concerns and individual disclosing behaviors. In this regard, prior literature has suggested three approaches capable to guide further research on the privacy paradox: First, scholars have highlighted the role of real outcomes as opposed to behavioral intentions, given that most prior research in the field of information privacy relied on the measurement of behavioral intentions only. Second, some scholars proposed a systematic distinction between privacy attitudes, such as privacy concerns, and situation-specific constructs, arguing that situational cues and considerations may override pre-existing tendencies in a concrete data-requesting situation. Third, an increasing stream of literature investigates the role of bounded rationality in the context of information privacy, indicating individuals’ capacities to take rational decisions to be limited, e.g. due to erroneous perceptions of control, or low salience of own privacy concerns.

Embracing these propositions, the research projects aims to unfold the dynamics that underlie individuals’ tendency to disclose information despite general worries. Given that (1) health-related information has been found to be perceived as highly sensitive and (2) the collection of such data is of increasing concern to both individuals and policymakers, investigating privacy-related decision-making is of special importance to the field of Health IS. Therefore, the project aims to explore the dynamics of privacy-related decisions in the context of health data primarily.

Publications

Kehr, F., Rothmund, T., Gollwitzer, M., Grimm, R., Füllgraf, W., Vertrauen ist gut, Kontrolle ist besser? Prädiktoren sicherheitsrelevanten Verhaltens bei jugendlichen Computernutzern, Zeitschrift für Datenschutz und Datensicherheit. (forthcoming).
Kehr, F., Kowatsch, T., Wentzel, D., Fleisch, E., Blissfully Ignorant: The Effects of General Privacy Concerns, General Institutional Trust, and Affect in the Privacy Calculus, Information Systems Journal, Special Issue on: Reframing Privacy in a Networked World. (forthcoming)
Kehr, F., Kowatsch, T., Wentzel, D., Fleisch, E. (2015) Thinking Styles and Privacy Decisions: Need for Cognition, Faith into Intuition, and the Privacy Calculus, International Conference on Wirtschaftsinformatik (WI), Osnabrück, Germany. [PDF]
Aeschlimann, L., Harasgama, R., Kehr, F., Lutz, C., Milanova, V., Müller, S., Strathoff, P., Tamò, A., Re-Setting the Stage for Privacy – A Multi-Layered Privacy Interaction Framework and its Application, In: S. Brändli, R. Harasgama, R. Schister & A. Tamò, Schriften der Assistierenden der Universität St. Gallen 2014, Band 9: Mensch und Maschine – Symbiose oder Parasitismus. St. Gallen: University Press. [PDF]
Kehr, F., Wentzel, D., Kowatsch, T. (2014) Privacy Paradox Revised: Pre-Existing Attitudes, Psychological Ownership, and Actual Disclosure, International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS), Auckland, New Zealand. (PDF)
Kehr, F., Wentzel, D., Mayer, P. (2013) Rethinking the Privacy Calculus: On the Role of Dispositional Factors and Affect, International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS), Milan, Italy.(PDF)